Tag: polarr

Switchover (part 3): Polarr

Third part in this switchover series, today I want to talk about Polarr.

Polarr is a multiplatform web-based photo editor, loaded with features and with a very pleasant interface. It is technically a web-app, but done so well that you barely notice it. Actually, I had to read it online, otherwise I would have never discover that.

Workspace 1_001
Polarr on launch. It has a very clean interface (yes, I switched to standard Ubuntu and GNOME).

Polarr comes in two interfaces, User and Pro, the latter offering more options. I started straight away with the Pro interface having some experience with photo editing.

Workspace 1_002.png
There are several options for editing, masking, exporting, cropping, rotation…. the only thing it does not do is coffee.

The controls are superb, despite being unable to manually input numbers. These sliders show the effect that sliding in one or the other direction will have and they offer live preview, so you can see the effect as you slide (something that darktable still hasn’t and annoys me). The histogram is shown on the upper left corner, but it is possible to move it around the screen as preferred.

Selection_005
Curves are included and are very neatly implemented in a non intrusive way. It is possible to work on the general curve or on the single colour components.

There are several adjustments available, which can be applied globally (on the entire picture) or locally (through the use of masking). Masking can be elliptical, gradient or set manually with a brush tool.

Workspace 1_003
There is a huge selection of filters available.

There are also filters, available, although they are more like “presets”. Once applied, their settings can be completely altered and it is also possible to save your own presets/filters. Very handy as starting points or for quick fixes.

Workspace 1_004
Exporting options. Not a vast selection, but functional.

All edits can be undoed and restored, they are saved separately from the picture itself. It is possible to save a copy of the edited pictures via the Export function which shows the window above. It is possible to set custom metadata, apply a custom watermark, single and batch exporting. Batch exporting also allows for batch renaming and filter application.

Polarr is free to use, and can be downloaded from the official website (or used straight from there, as a matter of fact). There is also a subscription  (less than £30/year) that offers some more features and works with all versions. It is available for Windows, Linux/ChromeOS and macOS. I highly recommend this software!